1. A Marconi-Stille recording machine, which the BBC helped to develop from the Blattnerphone. Like the earlier device, it also used thin steel for tape, a single spool of which weighed more than 20lb 

    A Marconi-Stille recording machine, which the BBC helped to develop from the Blattnerphone. Like the earlier device, it also used thin steel for tape, a single spool of which weighed more than 20lb 

  2. Classroom Projects from Trunk Records
I’ve always collected albums made by schools. Most are terrible. A few are not. This is a collection of the more wondrous ones I have found.
Featured on the album are small primary school choirs or groups singing obscure folk songs to full-blown avant-garde experiments written and performed by children still at secondary or grammar school. As far as dating goes, the earliest recording is 1959, the latest 1977. It has taken a few years to put together just because the records are so hard to find. Also, for this very special project I used the artistic talents of Julian House for the sleeve, as he is a fellow collector and enthusiast of such recordings.

    Classroom Projects from Trunk Records

    I’ve always collected albums made by schools. Most are terrible. A few are not. This is a collection of the more wondrous ones I have found.

    Featured on the album are small primary school choirs or groups singing obscure folk songs to full-blown avant-garde experiments written and performed by children still at secondary or grammar school. As far as dating goes, the earliest recording is 1959, the latest 1977. It has taken a few years to put together just because the records are so hard to find. Also, for this very special project I used the artistic talents of Julian House for the sleeve, as he is a fellow collector and enthusiast of such recordings.

  3. Cassette Memories from Soundry on Vimeo.

    Aki Onda‘s cassette collection consists of thousands of audio tapes and much more sonic memories. Keen on bringing personal sonic experiences to unusual places the artist reveals, disturbs and absorbs the past and present sonic energies of the spaces he performs. Soundry went out to meet with Aki on the occasion of a new chapter in the cassette memories series, performed at the beaux-arts de Paris.

     

    From http://soundry.com/

  4. Recording Our Planet’s Acoustic Heritage—Before It’s Gone | Audubon Magazine →

  5. The dark side of silence →

    Professor David Hendy considers the age-old human desire for peace and quiet and the potential downsides of drowning out our own noise.

  6. So Many Snapshots, So Few Voices Saved →

  7. In the Field →

    20/12/2012
    In the Field, a two day symposium exploring the art and craft of field recording at the British Library, 15-16 February 2013
    A two day symposium to open up and explore the practice, art and craft of field recording through a series of panel presentations, listenings and screenings. Starting from the early days of field recording the symposium aims to relate the multitude of contemporary field recording practices to their historical precedents and investigate issues in contemporary practices. These include: How field recordings are distributed to and heard by an audience; Recording the unheard; Mapping the urban; and questioning the extended nature of the field in a digital networked landscape.

    Presenters include:
    Chris Watson, Christina Kubisch, Jana Winderen, Peter Cusack, Ximena Alarcón, Joeri Bruyninckx, Angus Carlyle, Des Coulam, Simon Elliott, Felicity Ford, Helen Frosi (Sound fjord), Cathy Lane, Ici-Même, Zoe Irvine, Udo Noll – Radio Aporee, Francesca Panetta, Nye Parry, Cheryl Tipp, Davide Tidoni, David Vélez, Salome Voegelin, Claudia Wegener, and Mark Peter Wright.

  8. Musique concrète

  9. John Cage - The Works for Percussion 2 - THIRD COAST PERCUSSION

  10. Cutting branches into two wheelbarrows

    From Justin Buckley

    An unedited field recording of three gardeners (including myself) cutting branches into smaller segments into two wheelbarrows. Although the recording wasn’t made with any musical intention nor was the branch cutting done as a performance, there’s still a nice interplay between the snipping sound of the shears against the bangs of the falling branches into the wheelbarrows. Credits for the ‘non-performance’ go to fellow gardeners Fumi Takayanagi and Ronny Holzmüller (who is by the way also on Soundcloud here: https://soundcloud.com/paul-novik).